Tuesday, January 16, 2007

For shame: The United States is still holding 393 detainees at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba. Some of them are bound to be dangerous to the United States; but if someone can explain to me why we’re still holding Gholam Ruhani and Shakhrukh Hamiduva, I’d love to hear it. The Washington Post explains the saga of the many low-profile inmates from the war in Afghanistan:

Gholam Ruhani was among them, the prison’s third official inmate, flown in by cargo plane with the first group of 20 men. The 23-year-old Afghan shopkeeper, who spoke a little English, was seized near his hometown of Ghazni when he agreed to translate for a Taliban government official seeking a meeting with a U.S. soldier.

Ruhani is still at Guantanamo, marking the fifth anniversary of the prison and his own captivity. He remains as stunned about his fate, according to transcripts of his conversations with military officers, as he was when U.S. military police led him inside the razor wire on Jan. 11, 2002, and accused him of being America’s enemy.

“I never had a war against the United States, and I am surprised I’m here,” Ruhani told his captors during his first chance to hear the military’s reasons for holding him, three years after he arrived at Guantanamo. “I tried to cooperate with Americans. I am no enemy of yours.”


“We of course had to make snap judgments in the battlefield,” said one administration official involved in reviewing Guantanamo cases, who spoke anonymously to avoid angering superiors. “Where we had problems was that once we had individuals in custody, no one along the layers of review wanted to take a risk. So they would take a shred of evidence that a detainee was associated with another bad person and say that’s a reason to keep them.”


One is Shakhrukh Hamiduva, an 18-year-old Uzbek refugee who fled his country after the government there killed one of his uncles and jailed other relatives. He tried to cross the border from Afghanistan when U.S. bombs started falling but was captured by a tribal leader and sold to U.S. forces for a bounty. He said soldiers told him he would be released, but instead he ended up in Cuba.

“We went after small fries at every turn,” said Neal Katyal, a Georgetown University law professor who helped argue the Supreme Court case last June that struck down the government’s original plan for military trials. “Gitmo blew our credibility. And it’s going to take a long time to get it back.”


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